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All-Russia Exhibition Centre is a permanent general-purpose trade show in Moscow, Russia.

 
    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The "All-Russia Exhibition Centre", also known as a communist's temples complex, also known as a communist's idols valley, also known as a Soviet Parthenon, is a state joint-stock company, officially abbreviated as GAO "VVC", which stands for "Gosudarstvennoye Aktsionernoye Obshchestvo 'Vserossiyskiy Vystavochny Centr'". VVC is a member of exhibition associations: IUEF (since 1991) and UFI (since 1997).

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The exhibition was established February 17, 1935 as the All-Union Agricultural Exhibition (VSKhV). Also, known as An existing site (then known as Ostankino Park, a country territory recently incorporated into the city limits), was approved in August 1935. The master plan by Vyacheslav Oltarzhevsky was approved in April 1936, and the first show season was announced to begin in July 1937.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    On the image: Fountain "Friendship of Peoples of the USSR" - is one of the main symbols of the Agricultural Exhibition-ENEA-Russian Exhibition Center. There were embodied the ideals of friendship and peace, which was the main strategy and the center line of the policy of the USSR in the 1950s.
    The fountain was designed by architect-artist KT Topuridze, engineer VI Klyavina and a team of sculptors 3. Bazhenova, AI Tenet, IM Chaikov, 3. B. Ryleev and VP Gavrilova. It was opened in 1954.
    Large octagonal pond, which was erected in the center of the fountain was built on the site of small pavilions that were behind the old main pavilion in 1939. Stepped fountain granite base, which in terms reminiscent of a flower smoothly into the cup-shaped immense sheaf, sunflowers and hemp. Around it are set, covered with gold leaf, 16 girls, symbolizing the republic of the USSR until 1956,

    However, plans did not materialise, and three weeks before the deadline Joseph Stalin personally postponed the exhibition by one year (to August 1938). It seemed that this time everything would be ready on time, but again the builders failed to complete their work, and regional authorities failed to select and deliver proper exhibits. Some pavilions and the 1937 entrance gates by Oltarzhevsky were torn down to be replaced with more appropriate structures (most pavilions were criticised for having no windows). According to Oltarzhevsky's original plan, all of the pavilions were to be constructed from wood. In 1938, a government commission examined the construction and decided that it did not suit the ideological direction of the moment. The exhibition was considered too modest and too temporary. Oltarzhevsky was arrested, together with the Commissar for Agriculture and his staff, and eventually released in 1943. Later, he worked on the 1947-1953 Moscow skyscraper project.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    On the image: Memorial museum of astronautics with an obelisk "To Subjugators of space". Was erected in Moscow in 1964 to celebrate achievements of the Soviet people in space exploration. It depicts a starting rocket that rises on its contrail. The monument is 110 m tall, has 77 incline, and is made of titanium. The Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics is located inside the base of the monument. The monument is located outside the main entry to today's All-Russia Exhibition Centre, in the northeastern part of Moscow, near Prospekt Mira ("Peace Avenue"). The easiest access is from the VDNKh subway station.

    Soviet Union was the pioneer of space exploration, having launched both the first satellite and the first manned flight, as well as building the orbital stations, pioneering "walks in space" and launching scientific probes to other planets, most notably Venus.

    The achievements are showcased in the Cosmonautics museum at the entrance to the VDNKh exposition. The museum is housed at the base of the immense and poignant 100m high monument to space exploration.

    As a result, in August 1938 Nikita Khrushchev, speaking at the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union assembly, declared that the site is not ready, and the opening was extended to August 1939. It opened indeed August 1, 1939, and worked in 8AM - 11PM mode until October 25 (40,000 daily attendance). 1940 and 1941 seasons followed; after the German invasion, July 1, 1941 the exhibition was closed - until the end of World War II.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    Winter's photo. Central Pavilion of the All-Russia Exhibition Centre. Built in 1954 on the project GV Shuko and EA carpenter. At the Agricultural Exhibition 1939 Main Pavilion located on the site of the area between the fountain "Stone Flower" and "Friendship of the Peoples of the USSR." Height of the roof and spire - 90 meters.

    In October, 1948 the State ordered to renew the Exhibition, starting with the 1950 season. Again, the opening was postponed more than once; the first post-war season opened in 1954 (still as Agricultural exhibition). In 1956 season the planners set aside an Industrial area within the main territory; more restructuring and rebuilding followed. In 1959 the park was renamed Exhibition of Achievements of the National Economy or VDNKh.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    The hammer and sickle are a symbol of the communist movement. The hammer stands for the industrial working class while the sickle represents the agricultural workers; together the hammer and sickle represent the unity of these two groups.
    It is also speculated that the hammer represents power, while the sickle represents efficiency: "Power and Efficiency."
    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    On the image: Rabochiy i Kolkhoznitsa (Worker and Kolkhoz Woman) (The Worker and Collective Farm Woman) is a famous landmark of monumental art, "the ideal and symbol of the Soviet epoch", that represents a dynamic sculpture group of two figures with a sickle and a hammer raised over their heads. It is 24.5 meters (78 feet) high, made from stainless steel by Vera Mukhina for the 1937 World's Fair in Paris, and subsequently moved to Moscow. The sculpture is an example of the socialist realistic style, as well as Art Deco style. The worker holds aloft a hammer and the kolkhoz woman a sickle to form the hammer and sickle symbol. These two figures, near the VDNKh metro station, are impressive caricatures of the perfect Soviet citizens. Huge, metallic, muscular, devoted Communist machines that stand high above the exhibition park.

    The hammer and sickle have become the pan-communist symbol, appearing on the flags of most communist parties around the world. However, the flag of the Korean Workers' Party includes a hammer representing industrial workers, a hoe representing agricultural workers, and a brush (traditional writing-implement) representing the intelligentsia.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    By 1989 the exhibition had 82 pavilions with the exhibition area of 700,000 square metres. Each pavilion (including the 1939 "regions") had been dedicated to a particular industry or a field: the Engineering Pavilion (1954), the Space Pavilion (1966), the Atomic Energy Pavilion (1954), the People's Education Pavilion (1954), the Radioelectronics Pavilion (1958), the Soviet Culture Pavilion (1964).

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    During the Soviet times, each year VDNKh hosted more than 300 national and international exhibitions and many conferences, seminars and meetings of scientists and industry professionals. These events attracted about 11 million visitors annually, including 600,000 guests from outside the Soviet Union. The "Radioelectronics" exhibition hall for some years housed the working (and unique) prototypes of the most advanced ES EVM computers to date, which were time-shared by many research organisations right on the premises.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The most memorable feature of the exhibition site was the statue Worker and Kolkhoz Woman (Rabochiy i Kolkhoznitsa), featuring the gigantic figures of a man and woman holding together the famous "hammer and sickle". The sculpture, which reaches 25 meters toward the sky, was created by Vera Mukhina and originally crowned the 35-meter-tall Soviet pavilion at the Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne (1937). The statue was featured on a logo of Mosfilm, Russia's largest movie studio.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    Animals production pavilion.

    In 1992, VDNKh was renamed, receiving its current name VVC. It occupies 2,375,000 square metres of which 266,000 square metres are used for indoor exhibits. The territory of VVC is greater than that of the Principality of Monaco and has approximately 400 buildings. Inadequate maintenance of Vera Mukhina's statue caused such disrepair that the statue was disassembled (see 2006 photographs of what's left). It was slated to be refurbished and installed on the top of the new pavilion by 2008, but funding shortages lead to dragged-out restoration. It was finally reerected in December 2009, now standing atop of a large constructivist pavilion, apparently recreating the original exhibition pavilion from the 1937 World's Fair in Paris that it was designed for.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The exhibition center was rebuilt by the vision of Joseph Stalin to create a cultural center by a Soviet city figure that glorify the ideology of communism and socialism. The place that was selected was Moscow's northern suburb called "Ostankino". The main planner was the architect Vyacheslav Oltarzhevsky who was planning a central avenue with fountains with small roads and at the end of the avenue a big square facing the central pavilion. A statue of Vladimir Lenin used to stand in the front of the pavilion. In the central square there is a big fountain called "the friendship of people fountain" which was created to glorify the people of the Soviet Union pending later there is another fountain that called "stone flower fountain" facing the "Ukraine Pavilion". Later there is another little square facing the Space Pavilion which in the center of the square standing a Tupolev Tu-154 aircraft, placed there in the 1960s after the pavilion of "agricultural machinery" become the "space pavilion". A big statue of Joseph Stalin stood in the square until 1948. This had previously stood on the banks of the Moskva River in the center of the city. the square is called "the Industrial Square".

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The northern area of the site is a common area between the exhibition center and the botanic garden of the Russian Academy of Sciences nearby and in it an agricultural pavilions and estate Pools vegetation with the "Michurin's Garden" and the "golden spike fountain". All the fountains in the center are covered with gold. There are also many statues scattered on site and especially statues of the leaders of the Soviet Union. In addition in the site there are also cinemas, cafe houses, theatre pavilions and also a church built after the fall of the Soviet Union.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    Photo: Fountain "Stone Flower" was created in 1954 under the project of the artist-architect KT Topuridze, sculptor P. Dobrynin. Some arts and sculptural details fountain created by sculptors 3. B. Ryleev and Alexandrova-Roslavlev. Mosaic works made in the workshop of the Academy of Arts. The fountain is located at the Plaza collective Exhibition of Achievements of the National Economy (ENEA USSR-Russia Exhibition Centre).

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    In the southern area of the site near the central entrance there is an Amusement Park with the Moscow-850 Ferris wheel, built in 2004 as part of Moscow's 850th anniversary celebrations. also built the restord pavilion of the soviet pavilion that was on Expo 67 that was in 1967 in Montreal and become the "Moscow pavilion". All the pavilions and the fountains were planned by Soviet architects and the fountains were designed by Soviet artists. All designed in Stalinist architecture, some pavilions were built in wedding cake style like the "central pavilion" that was famous in the communist states in that time.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    The five-pointed red star is a symbol of communism as well as broader socialism in general. It is sometimes understood to represent the five fingers of the worker's hand, which run the five continents; or it is understood to symbolize the five entities "classes" of socialist society: workers, farmers, intellectuals, soldiers, and youth.

    In 2008 the "big constructivist pavilion" was built as a replica of the original Soviet pavilion of 1937 Expo that stood opposite the Nazi pavilion. In 2009 the renovated Statue of Worker and Kolkhoz Woman was erected on top of that building.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    In 1954 building the gates with the central entrance gate and the "tractor driver and sovkhoz woman" statue that was stood near the central pavilion in the 1930s. To the center exhibitions there are six gates and today can be rent a car or bicycles that can be used to travel around the site.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    There are exhibition and commercial centers of Armenia; Kyrgyzstan; commercial, exhibition, informative and marketing centre of Belarusian in the All-Russian Exhibition Centre. They also negotiate about opening of Ayzerbaydzhanskaya Republic, Republic of Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Volga and Central Federal Districts of Russian Federation in All-Russian Exhibition Centre. Also on the territory of All-Russian Exhibition Centre are organized permanent exhibitions of states participants from the Commonwealth of Independent States and subjects of Russian Federation. These exhibitions represent science and technology, economic and cultural potential of States and Russia's regions.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    All-Russia Exhibition Center offers to rent 4 specially equipped conference halls for the negotiations, business meetings, press-conferences and other similar activities. The large and small conference halls are located in the administrative building of All-Russian exhibition center. The large conference hall seats 500 people. It has scene, equipped with platform for speeches, sound system and large screen for displaying video. The total area of this hall is 746,5 square meters.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre
    The hammer and sickle were first used during the Russian Revolution but they did not become the official symbol of the Russian Soviet Federated Socialist Republic until 1924. Since the Russian Revolution, the hammer and sickle have come to represent various communist parties and socialist states.

    Main Entrance
    VDNKh metro station (first car of the train from the center; exit in the direction to VDNKh) VDNKh Metro Station stop:

    buses: No. 33, 56, 76, 93, 136, 154, 172, 195, 239, 244, 803
    trolleys: No. 14, 48, 76
    trams: No. 11, 17
    interurban transportation: bus No. 388 (from Sergiev Posad)

    Northern Entrance (VVTs Severnaya bus station)
    Severanaya stop:
    buses: No. 56, 76, 93, 136, 172, 195, 803
    interurban transportation:
    buses: No. 6, 392 (from Koroliov)
    No. 316 (from Ivanteevka)
    No. 317 (from Krasnoarmeisk)
    No. 425 (from Sofrino)
    No. 451 (from Pushkino) Southern Entrance (VVTs Yuzhnaya bus station)
    VVTs Yuzhnaya bus station
    buses: No. 33, 76, 154, 244, 803
    trolleys: No. 13, 36, 69, 73
    trams: No. 17
    Entrance from the Food Market Side (Gorky Cinema Studio)
    Cinema Studio stop:
    bus: No. 154
    trolley: No. 48
    Sovkhoz Passageway
    Tourist Hotel stop:
    bus: No. 33

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    Religious communism is a form of communism centered on religious principles. The term usually refers to a number of egalitarian and utopian religious societies practicing the voluntary dissolution of private property, so that society's benefits are distributed according to a person's needs, and every person performs labor according to their abilities. "Religious communism" has also been used to describe the ideas of religious individuals and groups who advocate the application of communist policies on a wider scale, often joining secular communists in their struggle to abolish capitalism.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The use of the word communism in a religious context predates the use of the term to describe more secular forms of communism, such as that advocated by Franc,ois Babeuf in the 18th century, and Karl Marx in the 19th century. Because of the anti-religious nature of Marxism, many religious people on the political right oppose the use of the term communism to refer to religious communal societies, preferring names such as communalism instead

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    Communist symbolism consists of a series of symbols that represent (either literally or figuratively) a variety of themes associated with communism. These themes may include (but are not limited to) revolution, the proletariat, the peasantry, agriculture, or international solidarity. Communist states, parties and movements use these symbols to advance and create solidarity within their cause.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    Usually these symbols, along with a pentangle representing either the five inhabited continents (in the context of the six-continent model where Eurasia is counted as a single continent) or the five components of communist society (the peasants, the workers, the army, the intellectuals, and the youth), appear in yellow on a red background representing revolution. The flag of the Soviet Union incorporated a yellow-outlined red star and a yellow hammer and sickle on red. The flags of Vietnam, China, Angola, and Mozambique would all incorporate similar symbolism under communist rule.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    In Hungary, Latvia, Moldova, Lithuania and Poland, communist symbols are banned.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    Nowadays the area is used as a large recreation park with a funfair. In the the former exhibition pavillions all kinds of shops and stalls can be found.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The "All-Russia Exhibition Centre" was in the soviet union a huge exposition of the last advances of each soviet republic. Now days part of it is private and in use for small/medium bussines. Many trade fairs and exhibitions take place here and there is a permanent exhibition of different motives of the soviet era. What I liked most was the open air museum with a sky rocket used in the early days of the space conquest and some old airplanes. U can spend some hours just walking through this huge park. Many people go there to run or ride bycicle.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    This vast site of the Soviet exposition is a monument to the kitsch of Stalinist architecture. Each pavilion was designed initially to demonstrate economic achievements of Soviet republics, and thereafter they were grouped by industry or branch of agriculture.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    After collapse of Communism the site was left to fend for itself, and the result was shutting down its exposition and giving its space to shops. Nonetheless, it is still interesting to visit to study the architecture of the period.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre used to be an exposition site to show off the wondrous achievements of the Soviet Union. Now the imposing and grand buildings have been given over to shops. If you've come to Moscow looking for Soviet ghosts, this is a place to find them, living cheek by jowl with the ferocious new consumerism. And love of cats & butterflies, apparently.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    VDNKh or the All Russia Exhibition Centre is worth a visit for it's homage to economic & scientific accomplishments of the former Soviet Union. The displays represent different fields such as space, eduction, agriculture, technology etc. with outsized monuments depicting idealized Soviet Comrades. Some of the pavilions are now closed & others have been turned into kiosks or shops, but nevertheless still interesting. The picture taken is of a main entrance is a triumphal archway surmounted by towering statues of a tractor driver and a farm girl brandishing sheaves of wheat, which sets the scale for the avenue of fountains that leads to a Lenin statue and the Central Pavilion.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    The park had various Soviet rockets and airplanes and has beautiful gardens with fountains. Loads of people hang out there and it is easy to just chat to people and make friends with Russians. There are market stalls selling souvenirs too.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    It is very strange and somehow typical for today's Russia. It was build by Stalin to represent all Russian republics and the most favourite sciences. It is fantastically huge and great - or better: it was. After the revolution in the 90's nobody saw any sense in it anymore and they thought about what to do with it. Well, they rented it to businesses. Now in every temple there is something on sale.

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre

    Very big, I would say enormous park with constant exhibitions there. 2 big fountains and lots of places to eat- small restaurants

    All-Russia Exhibition Centre







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